How to Sue a Company for Wrongful Termination of Work Contract in South Africa

How to Sue a Company for Wrongful Termination of Work Contract in South Africa: breach of employment contract.

What is considered Wrongful Termination of Work Contract in South Africa

In South Africa, wrongful termination of a work (breach of employment contract)contract occurs when an employer dismisses an employee without a valid reason or without following the correct procedures. Here are some examples of what would be considered wrongful termination:

  • Unfair dismissal: This occurs when an employer dismisses an employee without a fair reason, or without following the correct procedures set out in the Labour Relations Act.
  • Automatic unfair dismissal: This occurs when an employee is dismissed for certain reasons such as taking part in protected strikes, opposing discrimination or harassment, or being a member of a trade union.
  • Constructive dismissal: This occurs when an employer makes working conditions so difficult that the employee is forced to resign, or when an employer breaches a fundamental term of the employment contract, such as reducing an employee’s salary or demoting them without good reason.
  • Retrenchment without following the correct procedures: If an employer decides to retrench employees, they must follow the correct procedures as set out in the Labour Relations Act and the Code of Good Practice on Retrenchment.
  • Dismissal for discriminatory reasons: It’s illegal to dismiss an employee on the basis of their race, gender, sexual orientation, age, disability, or any other grounds prohibited by the Employment Equity Act.
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It’s important to note that an employer has a right to dismiss an employee for a fair reason and after following a fair procedure as per Labour Relations Act. An employee has the right to challenge a dismissal that they consider to be unfair, by referring the dispute to the Commission for Conciliation, Mediation and Arbitration (CCMA) or the Bargaining Council, if they are covered by one.

Steps on How to Sue a Company for Wrongful Termination in South Africa

If you believe that you have been wrongfully terminated from your job in South Africa, you may have the option to sue your employer for wrongful dismissal. Here are the steps you would need to take:

  1. Gather evidence: Before you can take legal action, you will need to gather evidence to support your claim of wrongful termination. This may include documents such as your employment contract, emails or other correspondence with your employer, and any witness statements.
  2. Try to resolve the dispute through mediation: Mediation is often a quicker and less costly way to resolve disputes than going to court. In South Africa, the Commission for Conciliation, Mediation and Arbitration (CCMA) provides a free service for resolving disputes between employers and employees.
  3. Initiate legal action: If mediation is unsuccessful or not an option, you can initiate legal action by filing a claim in the Labour Court. You will need to prove that your dismissal was unfair, and that your employer did not follow the correct procedures.
  4. Consult with a lawyer: It is advisable to consult with a lawyer who has experience in labour law and can help you navigate the legal process and represent you in court.
  5. Prepare your case: You will need to provide evidence and make legal arguments to support your claim that your dismissal was wrongful.
  6. Attend the hearing: If your case proceeds to trial, you will need to attend court and present your evidence. The judge will hear both sides of the case, consider the evidence and make a ruling.
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It’s important to note that the process of suing a company for wrongful termination can be complex and time-consuming. It’s recommended to seek legal advice from a qualified attorney familiar with labour law in South Africa to ensure your rights are protected and you can make a well-informed decision.

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List all Acts that Protect Employees in South Africa

In South Africa, there are several acts and laws that protect the rights of employees. Here is a list of some of the main acts and laws that protect employees in South Africa, along with links to more information:

  1. The Labour Relations Act (LRA) No. 66 of 1995: This act regulates the relationship between employers and employees, and sets out the rights and responsibilities of both parties. It also establishes the Commission for Conciliation, Mediation and Arbitration (CCMA) which is a body that resolves disputes between employers and employees.

Link: http://www.labour.gov.za/DOL/legislation/acts/labour-relations-act

  1. The Basic Conditions of Employment Act (BCEA) No. 75 of 1997: This act regulates the basic conditions of employment, such as working hours, leave, and termination.
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Link: http://www.labour.gov.za/DOL/legislation/acts/basic-conditions-of-employment-act

  1. The Employment Equity Act (EEA) No. 55 of 1998: This act promotes equality in the workplace and prohibits discrimination on the grounds of race, gender, sexual orientation, age, disability, and other grounds.

Link: http://www.labour.gov.za/DOL/legislation/acts/employment-equity-act

  1. The Occupational Health and Safety Act (OHSA) No. 85 of 1993: This act sets out the responsibilities of employers to provide a safe and healthy working environment for their employees.

Link: http://www.labour.gov.za/DOL/legislation/acts/occupational-health-and-safety-act

  1. The Skills Development Levies Act (SDLA) No. 9 of 1999: This act provides for the levying of skills development levies to fund the training and development of employees.

Link: http://www.labour.gov.za/DOL/legislation/acts/skills-development-levies-act

  1. The Unemployment Insurance Act (UIA) No. 63 of 2001: This act provides for the payment of unemployment insurance benefits to employees who become unemployed.

Link: http://www.labour.gov.za/DOL/legislation/acts/unemployment-insurance-act

  1. The Compensation for Occupational Injuries and Diseases Act (COIDA) No. 130 of 1993: This act provides for the payment of compensation to employees who are injured or contract diseases in the course of their employment.

Link: http://www.labour.gov.za/DOL/legislation/acts/compensation-for-occupational-injuries-and-diseases-act

Please keep in mind that laws may change over time, and it is important to check the most recent legislation and seek legal advice from a qualified attorney if you have any questions about your rights as an employee.